Domnicana Victoria Web Design

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Fix computer crash yourself,it is too easy!

Identifying the reason for crashing is essential prior to fixing the computer. The initial step is to reboot your computer. If the rebooting goes smoothly, it is apparent that you are facing a problem with your registry. If you cannot reboot instantly, then rebooting your computer in safe mode and locating a registry cleaner to fix your problem is essential.

Every file present in your registry contains a command or direction for every program and application on your computer. Registry files are the files that give your computer the instructions for what to do next. If these registry files get corrupt or misplaced, your computer fails to understand what to do. In these instances, your computer loses control, eventually leading to a crash.

At this stage the priority is to fix these registry files. In such situations it is suggested that you do not try to fix the registry yourself. Immediately free download registry cleaner software from http://www.miracleoptimizer.info and  free scan your computer to locate any errors. This software will identify all the missing entries or errors, restoring them right away. In many cases, your computer will be back to normal. It is recommended that you run this software once a month for best results.

Another cause of crashes is when new software is installed. If you have recently installed a new program or file, this could also be the source of the problem. You should locate the program and uninstall it. In case you are incapable of booting up your computer in normal mode, you are advised to try booting in safe mode first. If the new program is at fault, removing it should solve the problem. Obviously you would not re-install that program later on.

Most computer crashes occur due to a problem with the computer’s registry files. This is the core reason for any crash. So, running registry cleaning software from http://www.miracleoptimizer.info  and eliminating all errors is essential to avoid computer crashes in the future. SubsequentlyFeature Articles, fixing the registry files will keep you from having to ask the question ‘how do I fix a computer crash’ again.

There Are So Many Kinds Of Design!

There is a world of different kinds of designs, there are so many kinds of designs that it is hard to choose from.

Graphic design can be classified as several different fields from learning how to design graphics on a car to drawings on paper. Graphic design is where a person takes several colors or styles and put them together to make their own designs that can be turned into wild, contemporary or modern graphic designs.

Interior design is very popular among budding decorators. Interior design is also offered in some public schools as an elective to teach young students about the art of interior design. Interior design is not limited to just females; males can also enjoy interior design. Interior design is a class where you learn how to decorate the inside of something meaning it can be the inside of a car, business or home.

We all seem to get fascinated with tattoos at one point or another because of the color and intricate detail that can be found with tattoos. Tattoo design is learning how to draw different designs on the skin, learning what looks good and what does not. Learning how to tattoo isn’t just as easy as picking up a tube of ink and a needle and drawing there is a skill that must be learned.

The newer generations are getting really involved with web design and learning all they can about it. Have you ever searched the web for a particular topic and been taken away with the web design of the site itself? Web design is a great class for anyone to get involved with that likes working with computers. This kind of class deals with learning the knowledge behind the computer and different programs so you can design a web page for a school, retail storeArticle Search, business or any other kind of site that you may find when searching the web.

All girls it seems like at one point of their life want to become a fashion designer. We all strive to look different and unique and by learning fashion design you will learn the styles of clothes as well as what can be worn together and what can not in order to make it in the fashion world. Some of the most popular fashion designers started out doodling and just having a dream. Fashion design isn’t just hot among the girls but the boys are really getting interested in it as well.

No matter what type of design you want to learn there is a world of opportunity out there in all of them. A fashion designer isn’t just limited to just clothes and an interior designer isn’t just limited to a house. Design is opening up in all job fields. I am sure you will find the correct design choice for you.

There Are So Many Kinds Of Design!

There is a world of different kinds of designs, there are so many kinds of designs that it is hard to choose from.

Graphic design can be classified as several different fields from learning how to design graphics on a car to drawings on paper. Graphic design is where a person takes several colors or styles and put them together to make their own designs that can be turned into wild, contemporary or modern graphic designs.

Interior design is very popular among budding decorators. Interior design is also offered in some public schools as an elective to teach young students about the art of interior design. Interior design is not limited to just females; males can also enjoy interior design. Interior design is a class where you learn how to decorate the inside of something meaning it can be the inside of a car, business or home.

We all seem to get fascinated with tattoos at one point or another because of the color and intricate detail that can be found with tattoos. Tattoo design is learning how to draw different designs on the skin, learning what looks good and what does not. Learning how to tattoo isn’t just as easy as picking up a tube of ink and a needle and drawing there is a skill that must be learned.

The newer generations are getting really involved with web design and learning all they can about it. Have you ever searched the web for a particular topic and been taken away with the web design of the site itself? Web design is a great class for anyone to get involved with that likes working with computers. This kind of class deals with learning the knowledge behind the computer and different programs so you can design a web page for a school, retail storePsychology Articles, business or any other kind of site that you may find when searching the web.

All girls it seems like at one point of their life want to become a fashion designer. We all strive to look different and unique and by learning fashion design you will learn the styles of clothes as well as what can be worn together and what can not in order to make it in the fashion world. Some of the most popular fashion designers started out doodling and just having a dream. Fashion design isn’t just hot among the girls but the boys are really getting interested in it as well.

No matter what type of design you want to learn there is a world of opportunity out there in all of them. A fashion designer isn’t just limited to just clothes and an interior designer isn’t just limited to a house. Design is opening up in all job fields. I am sure you will find the correct design choice for you.

There Are So Many Kinds Of Design!

There is a world of different kinds of designs, there are so many kinds of designs that it is hard to choose from.

Graphic design can be classified as several different fields from learning how to design graphics on a car to drawings on paper. Graphic design is where a person takes several colors or styles and put them together to make their own designs that can be turned into wild, contemporary or modern graphic designs.

Interior design is very popular among budding decorators. Interior design is also offered in some public schools as an elective to teach young students about the art of interior design. Interior design is not limited to just females; males can also enjoy interior design. Interior design is a class where you learn how to decorate the inside of something meaning it can be the inside of a car, business or home.

We all seem to get fascinated with tattoos at one point or another because of the color and intricate detail that can be found with tattoos. Tattoo design is learning how to draw different designs on the skin, learning what looks good and what does not. Learning how to tattoo isn’t just as easy as picking up a tube of ink and a needle and drawing there is a skill that must be learned.

The newer generations are getting really involved with web design and learning all they can about it. Have you ever searched the web for a particular topic and been taken away with the web design of the site itself? Web design is a great class for anyone to get involved with that likes working with computers. This kind of class deals with learning the knowledge behind the computer and different programs so you can design a web page for a school, retail storeComputer Technology Articles, business or any other kind of site that you may find when searching the web.

All girls it seems like at one point of their life want to become a fashion designer. We all strive to look different and unique and by learning fashion design you will learn the styles of clothes as well as what can be worn together and what can not in order to make it in the fashion world. Some of the most popular fashion designers started out doodling and just having a dream. Fashion design isn’t just hot among the girls but the boys are really getting interested in it as well.

No matter what type of design you want to learn there is a world of opportunity out there in all of them. A fashion designer isn’t just limited to just clothes and an interior designer isn’t just limited to a house. Design is opening up in all job fields. I am sure you will find the correct design choice for you.

Divus Design

Divus Design is a graphic design business located in South East Sydney … offering creative services … logo design, … … website design, … design, brochure desi

Divus Design is a graphic design business located in South East Sydney Australia offering creative services including logo design, corporate identity, website design, promotional design, brochure design, documentation & design, business stationery, print design & management and all general graphic design services. We at Divus Design know how important your business identity is and it’s more than just your sales team and the people who answer your telephones that portrayes the image of your business. When not in direct contact with your firm, your customers or potential customers use the impression in their heads or on paper about your business. It is ussually your corporate look that they think of when they think of you. The first impression of your company for a customer will probably be your logo, which they will use to make assumstions about your business. If your an IT company and your logo is sharp swift and technically advanced, thats the exact first impression that your customer will have of you and your business. – You konw what they say, first impressions last!

Our designs are creative and conceptual designs that work well and look good! We design from scratch every time making your corporate identity, logo, covers or advertisments one of a kind, and this is important in a competitive market more so than most would believe. Most of the time buying a product or service the decision is made subconsiously by the creative side of our brains. Our eyes pick up the easiest shapes and objects to recognise and the most asthetically pleasing images talk to us the best. At Divus Design we have few rules and bouderies to our work, however we always structure our creative thinking around these four words – CLEAN – SIMPLE – FRESH – CONCEPTUAL.

A Natural Work in Progress

Catherine Zimmerman’s first day as a TV news camerawoman started with a bang — literally.

Dressed in a skirt and boots, she was standing on an embankment, hoisting a 30-pound camera on her shoulder while filming bike riders when, suddenly, she lost her footing and fell. She quickly picked herself up, brushed herself off — and continued shooting as if nothing had happened.

This was the first challenge in her new career, but certainly not the last.

When Zimmerman started her job back in the mid-1970s at the NBC affiliate in Dayton, Ohio, she was the first camerawoman on staff and one of just a handful of women in the newsroom. She earned about $35 less a week than her male counterparts, even though she was more educated than they were.

“I was definitely a pioneer,” Zimmerman recalls. “And I had to deal with a lot of resistance. The cameramen were really threatened because they didn’t believe that a woman could do their job.”

To prove them wrong, Zimmerman worked harder and longer than anyone else — eventually garnering awards for her film work, as well as the respect of her male colleagues.

Now, 35 years later, Zimmerman is taking on a new challenge: She’s embarking on a career as a sustainable organic landscape designer.

Zimmerman, 57, started thinking about a career in landscaping nearly a decade ago. Though she enjoyed her work as a videographer, she wasn’t sure how much longer she’d be able to lug around such heavy camera equipment. So in 2002, she enrolled in a program at the Graduate School, where she began studying horiticulture and gardening. “Until then, I always thought of myself as a good gardener, but the more I learned, the more I realized how little I knew,” she says.

She developed an interest in organic gardening and decided to pursue that as her speciality. To reach more people, she used her film background to make videos about creating meadows without pesticides. This year, she released a self-published book: Urban & Suburban Meadows: Bringing Meadowscaping to Big and Small Spaces.

Getting people to garden without chemicals hasn’t been easy. Each year, homeowners use about 78 million pounds of pesticides for lawn care and gardening, according to the National Audubon Society. But the tide seems to be turning.

“People are starting to understand that it doesn’t make sense to put poison where our children play or on what we eat,” says Bill Duesing of the Northeast Organic Farming Association.

Slowly, Zimmerman is starting to build up her business as an organic gardener. But the single mother of three still does freelance work as a videographer to make ends meet. As for the future, Zimmerman is open to exploring other career possibilities. “Who knows?” she says. “Something else really interesting might come along and I’ll take on that challenge.”

First impressions form quickly on the web eye tracking study shows

When viewing a website, it takes users less than two-tenths of a second to form a first impression, according to recent eye-tracking research conducted at Missouri University of Science and Technology. But it takes a little longer — about 2.6 seconds — for a user’s eyes to land on that area of a website that most influences their first impression.

“We know first impressions are very important,” says Dr. Hong Sheng, assistant professor of business and information technology at Missouri S&T. “As more people use the Internet to search for information, a user’s first impressions of a website can determine whether that user forms a favorable or unfavorable view of that organization.”

Sheng’s research with Sirjana Dahal, who received her graduate degree from Missouri S&T last December, could also help web designers understand which elements of a website’s design are most important for users.

For their research, Sheng and Dahal enlisted 20 Missouri S&T students to view screenshots, or static images, of the main websites from 25 law schools in the U.S. The researchers chose law schools because that degree is not offered at Missouri S&T, so students would not compare those degree programs with one offered at their own campus.

“We wanted to show them sites that were relevant to them but not familiar to them,” says Sheng, whose research specialty is human-computer interaction.

Using eye-tracking software and an infrared camera in Missouri S&T’s Laboratory for Information Technology Evaluation, the researchers monitored students’ eye movements as they scanned the web pages. The researchers then analyzed the eye-tracking data to determine how long it took for the students to focus on specific sections of a page — such as the menu, logo, images and social media icons — before they moved on to another section.

Sheng and Dahal found that their subjects spent about 2.6 seconds scanning a website before focusing on a particular section. They spent an average of 180 milliseconds focusing, or “fixating,” on one particular section before moving on.

After each viewing of a website, Sheng and Dahal asked students to rate sites based on aesthetics, visual appeal and other design factors.

“The longer the participants stayed on the page, the more favorable their impressions were,” Sheng says. “First impressions are important for keeping people on pages.”

Sixteen of the 25 websites reviewed in the study were considered favorable by the subjects, Sheng says.

Through this research, Sheng and Dahal found that seven sections of the reviewed websites attracted the most interest from users. The participants spent an average of 20 seconds on each website.

The website sections that drew the most interest from viewers were as follows:

  • The institution’s logo. Users spent about 6.48 seconds focused on this area before moving on.
  • The main navigation menu. Almost as popular as the logo, subjects spent an average of 6.44 seconds viewing the menu.
  • The search box, where users focused for just over 6 seconds.
  • Social networking links to sites such as Facebook and Twitter. Users spent about 5.95 seconds viewing these areas.
  • The site’s main image, where users’ eyes fixated

A Great Place to Raise a Family

When my husband told me to go to a new launch website that shows all of the new condos in the Singapore area, I was so excited. We had been talking about moving into one of the new developments, but I honestly did not think that we would for a while. We had just found out that I was pregnant with our first child though, and he wanted all of us to live in a better area. I was really happy that this was happening on a faster timetable than I had imagined, and I went to the website he told me about to start looking for our new home.

This site was so great because it really did all of the homework for me. I did not have to go to each individual condo development’s website to get details.

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Magical Micro interactions

You understand and have created an app that looks amazing. It has a cool story and the visual design is impressive. But that’s not enough — it needs more, something that really connects with users and feels alive.

That’s where micro-interactions come in.

Micro-interactions are the secret ingredient  when it comes to creating an addictive app. These design moments keep users engaged, create unexpected delight  and are almost invisible to everyone but the designer.

You come across micro-interactions hundreds of times a day.

Each time you end an alarm, see a text message flash across the screen, are reminded of your turn in a game, skip a song in a music player or even as you change course based on traffic alerts during your morning commute. Every one of these tiny moments  forms a micro-interaction. And it’s likely that you don’t think about any of them, but each one contributes to why you continually use specific apps day after day.

What Are Micro-interactions?

A micro-interaction is any single task-based engagement with a device. Most of these engagements are barely noticeable, provided the flow feels smooth.

As described in Dan Saffer’s excellent book (highly recommended), micro-interactions help fulfill three specific functions:

  • Quickly communicate status or feedback
  • Visualize the result of an action
  • Help the user manipulate something on-screen

Slack, above, is a great  app that does all three of these jobs in one package. The app allows users to communicate in a closed-loop chat, attach documents and tag one another. All the while, the app provides real-time updates (such as marking messages as read) and helps users navigate around. It also uses notifications and other small actions to keep users in sync with what’s being communicated.

Microinteractions impact the user and function of the app in a variety of ways:

  • Turning things off or on
  • Commenting in any digital medium
  • Changing a setting or process
  • Checking a message or a notification
  • Sliding down the “screen” on a mobile device to refresh content
  • Interacting with a data element, such as checking the weather
  • Accomplishing isolated tasks
  • Connecting devices, such as those for multi-player games, or printing from your laptop
  • Sharing or liking a photo or video on a website

Simply put, a micro-interaction is an action from the user that triggers another action on the part of the device. Each of the interactions is based on a human-centered design concept, where the digital tool works and functions mirrors how a person would actually do something. And that’s the secret sauce to usability – interactions that behave as expected and in a “human way.”

In the example above designed with UXPin, we prototyped a website for finding fashion models. A card repesents each model, showing metric measurements and a business card download when you hover over the person’s face. For this particular scenario, the microinteraction reveals information smoothly. The animation adds some discoverability, making the design respond more lifelike to the user’s actions.

What Do Micro-interactions Really Do?

As you can see from the list above – and in no way is it inclusive of every micro-interaction – micro-interactions serve multiple roles. But speaking less specifically, they should always create

Huge Time Saving Features in Illustrator

From the author of

Adobe Illustrator CC Classroom in a Book (2014 release)

Learn More Buy

From the author of

Adobe Illustrator CC Classroom in a Book (2014 release)

Would I presume too much if I were to say you could stand to work faster in Illustrator? I could—and I wrote the book on Illustrator, literally. Illustrator is a big program with lots of tools and features, but we all get stuck in our ways, don’t we? In this article, I really wanted to expose a bunch of time-saving features in Illustrator—some widely used, some not so much—explain what each is, and point you in a direction where you could find out more if needed.

So let’s stop wasting time reading this opening, and get to saving time in Illustrator. The list of time saving features we will cover is as follows:

  • Layers
  • The Appearance Panel
  • Selections
  • Global Colors
  • Recolor Artwork
  • Graphic Styles
  • Blends

Layers

Yes, I had to start the list with layers. Why? Because although most of us have pretty good intentions when it comes to layers, we usually don’t live up to our own hype. How many times have you cursed at a file because you couldn’t somewhat quickly select a series of objects or you wanted to add a mask to only certain artwork? Well, layers are the unsung hero of Illustrator and, if used properly, can save you tons of time in the long run.

To me, layers are something that can help you right away, but they also save you from yourself later on. If you either hand the file off to someone else, or open the file some time down the road, a file with content organized in layers that make at least modest sense will cut down time when editing.

A nice tip for working with layers in Illustrator is to collect existing layers into a new layer. This is an easy way to organize your content into layers.

  1. Either Shift-click to Highlight layers/sublayers or Cmd/Ctrl-click to select layers/sublayers not next to each other in the layer stack.
  2. Choose Collect in New Layer from the Layers panel menu (see Figure 1).

The Value of UX Research in Product Development

When we talk about user experience, we quite often end up discussing UX Design. Some may even refer to UX and UX Design as a same thing, which they are not. Today I would like to draw your attention to the “pre-story” of amazing and usable design — user experience research.

Let’s try to answer two main questions:

  1. What is the value of UX research?
  2. How does it fit into the product development process?

Before diving any deeper into this topic, let’s first make sure we are all on the same page and to do so I want to refer to the basic understanding of user experience. I would like to quote Jacob Nielsen and Don Norman, people who can rightfully be named the “founding fathers” of user experience discipline. According to their definition:

“User experience encompasses all aspects of the end-user’s interaction with the company, its services, and its products.”

So when we talk about a user’s experience with a product, we mean the quality of user interaction not only with the product itself, but everything, including the design and copy of your ad, the look and feel of your website UI, the main features and functionality of your product, its usability, post purchase experiences and even the button label in your newsletter!

Obviously, creating a satisfying user experience is not that easy, but it is certainly possible when you know what your users need and you have the skills to build it.

To cut a long story short, with user experience research you get the knowledge and with design skills you build the product.

Let’s have a look at this illustration by Dan Willis that brilliantly highlights how exactly UX solves user problems.

According to Willis, UX includes visual design, information architecture, interaction design, usability, user research and content strategy.

It once again emphasizes the idea that user experience is a combination of multiple components and if you want to create a truly amazing product, those components need to work together in prfect harmony.

With this in mind, let’s now try to answer the first question:

What Is the Value of UX Research?

User experience research, which is basically the same as user research or design research or user studies or whatever other naming you may come across, is a bridge between users and business people.

I do not mean to say that entrepreneurs don’t care about user needs and wants, because a successful business idea eventually solves this or that user problem. How well does it solve the problem? How satisfied users feel with the solution?

UX research tries to put people in the center of product development process.

If we try to give it a definition, it would sound something like this:

User experience research is the process of understanding user behaviors, needs and attitudes using different observation and feedback collection methods.

So the true value of UX research is that it’s based on unbiased user feedback.

It’s not influenced by someone’s own opinion or authority. It simply speaks user’s thoughts.

This should be your number one argument when trying to communicate the

How Time Perception Impacts Interaction Design

How can you use time to your advantage in interaction design? Is it even controllable?

The elements of timing can be difficult to describe, but we all feel them, from the annoyance of waiting for something to load, to the exhilaration of breezing through page after page. The scale of timing is wide, ranging from noticeable increments to the tiny milliseconds that individually seem meaningless, but can add up to sway a user’s opinion one way or the other.

Our discussion in this piece applies all content that changes over time: video, sound, animations, and more. We’ll start by explaining why time matters, then discuss the elements of timing and how they can be improved, and then we’ll explore how speed and simplicity play a role.

Why Time Matters

Time can be a difficult concept to grasp because its range is so vast. Just as the size of an electron is almost unfathomable compared to the enormity of our galaxy, so too the span of a millisecond seems unrecognizable to the duration of a millenium.

But digital time is not the same as human time. A few seconds can mean the difference between a frustrating experience and a delightful one. We can attribute that to basic human psychology:

  1. Limits of memory and attention — As we described in Interaction Design Best Practices, designers must evaluate the cognitive load of interfaces. Otherwise, users will suffer from the loss of information in short-term memory, which causes frustration.
  2. People must feel in control — Nobody wants to be at the mercy of technology. Like we stated in a recent blog post, some people still treat computers as a black box. Digital products that make you wait will give off the impression of incompetence and/or arrogance.

There is a rhythm to user actions. In the field of UX, the power of time is measured in magnitudes of 10. It takes users 0.05 seconds to decide if a website is worth their time. If they decide to stay, they usually leave within 2-4 minutes.

Whether the goal is getting an update on your Facebook feed or comparing and buying products on Amazon, every experience breaks down into a series of interactions, and the time between interactions has a compounding effect on the user experience.

Elements of Time in Interaction Design

So how exactly does time relate to interaction design? David Malouf, Design Consultant, believes that time separates interaction design from all other UX disciplines. Time is more than just a linear progression because all interactions happen over time. As Malouf suggests, we can actually examine time from 3 separate perspectives: pace, responsiveness, and context.

1. Pace

In terms of design, pacing relates to how much is accomplished in a given amount of time. Immediately, you may be thinking, “well, the more the user can accomplish, the better,” but that’s not necessarily true.

Source: Hick’s Law

Experiential flow is much more important than the sheer number of available actions. As described by Hick’s Law, too many interface objects actually impede decision-making (and therefore goal accomplishment).

Consider, for example, the difference between one

Understanding Color Psychology for Impactful Web Design

It’s no secret that color psychology is used extensively in all aspects of design. From the colors used on day-to-day grocery items, to brand logos and website design, color is an important element that can convey a specific message to users.

Photo credit: Dropbox

According to Kissmetrics, when we view a color, our eyes send a message to a region of the brain called the hypothalamus. In turn, this sends further signals to the pituitary gland and then onto the thyroid glands. This then signals the release of hormones which cause fluctuations in our mood, emotion and as a result, our behavior.

Science tells us then that color evokes emotion which can result in negative, positive or mismatched feelings. Kissmetrics goes on to say that it takes just 90 seconds for a site visitor to form a judgement or opinion. Further to that, “62-90% of that interaction is determined by the color of a product alone.”

As described in the free e-book Web Design for the Human Eye, color plays an undeniable role in creating a strong first impression on users.

What Colors Mean

Every color means something to every person, although this meaning varies depending on our personal preferences and cultural background.

For a quick reference, take a look at the color chart below.

Photo credit: UXPin

Color psychology in design is not an exact science and studies have shown that it’s affected by individual perceptions. Societal considerations such as gender also have an impact on how the color is perceived. Further studies have found that it’s not always the color itself that make an impact, it’s also about how appropriate the user feels the color used is to the brand that’s using it.

Image source: Kissmetrics

So, if you’re designing for women, then purple is a pretty good bet as it’s universally liked by women but disliked by men (generally speaking, of course). In the image below, this is used to good effect for L’Oreal Paris. As you can see, the header and footer are black, which denotes class and elegance, so that you get the overall feeling that the product isn’t cheap, but high-end.

Image source: Kissmetrics

Additionally, white is used for the text, which denotes modernity and a sense of calm, while purple has been chosen to denote luxury, elegance and femininity – all of which are clearly appropriate for a site such as this.

(To learn more about minimalist design and using white space as a design tool, check out the free e-books The Elegance of Minimalism and The Zen of White Space in Web Design).

In the image below, for Women’s Health Magazine, the top banner is pink but otherwise the site is relatively devoid of color and relies instead on imagery and bold navigation. This is an interesting choice and one that could work against the site.

To begin with, pink is a very stereotypical color to use when a site is aimed at women, and it appeals to the sweet tooth,

How to Be a Great Email Designer Essential Tools

It’s can be hard to get excited about email design. But it is an ever-growing and ever-important part of branding and design for a large number of businesses, freelancers and even designers.

Email design can make or break the messages that you send to potentials customers or clients. Every email needs to have a strong framework and striking design. And it can be easier to create that you might think with the right resources and tools.

If you are looking for a magic email design formula, you won’t get it here. Simply because there is not one. But there are some things you can do to help maximize the impact of your email newsletter design.

  • Keep it simple.
  • Include a direct call to action.
  • Make it responsive.
  • Eliminate bells and whistles, including lots of links back to your website.
  • Be wary of images and backgrounds. It is important to note that many mobile browsers or email programs won’t automatically render images.
  • Connect the email you’re your brand’s style and design concepts.
  • Copy should be short, to the point and exciting.
  • Keep it in a single column format. If you are used to designing websites, think of it as a one-page website.
  • Relevant information should be above the scroll.
  • Use HTML for emails, rather than lots of images. This will improve load times and overall usability of the email.
  • Test it before sending on a variety of devices to ensure that the content and design will look like you intend it to.

Great Email Design Tools

From design and sending software to tools that help you code and test emails before sending, there are plenty of items out there that can make designing a great email even easier. For the new email designer, it can be a little daunting to figure out what tools you need to use or invest in.

Campaign Monitor, an email software company, recently asked a handful of email designers what they could not live without in terms of tools. Give designers were asked about the top tools for text and code editing, browser, testing and framework.

  • The top code editors were Sublime Text and Atom.
  • The top browser was Chrome by far, followed by Firefox.
  • The top testing tools were Litmus and Email on Acid.

Email Marketing Tools

There are different approaches to creating email newsletters. While some designers prefer to code from scratch others prefer the comfort of third-party software (most of which offers custom design features and templates).

There are a lot of third-party options out there. These can range in price from free to hundreds of dollars, based on the side of your email list and the frequency of distribution.

Some of the benefits to third-party tools are great list management and analytics features. Most also include responsive email newsletter frameworks for ease of building and make it easy to build with pre-coded parts.

Here are the top 10 options that are pretty widely used and get great feedback from users, according to PC Mag. The ranking takes a close look at each platform, features and cost. This is a great tool if you are shopping

The 4 Essential UX Documents Every Designer Needs

When it comes to UX documentation, wireframes and prototypes are certainly among the most important.

But that’s just the beginning. We’ve actually found four other documents to be extremely practical for everyday design. What sets these four apart is that they help designers understand the users, and that more than anything determines the design’s success.

Photo credit: Rosenfeld Media. 

In this article we’ll explain why these easily skipped “supplementals” are really “essentials.”  To learn about 25 helpful design documents and processes, check out the free Guide to UX Design Process & Documentation.

1. Persona

We’ll start with the most telling of user documentation: the persona.

Your personas (limit them to 2-5) go beyond your target demographics. They are fictional personalities based on research which act as a placeholder for your ideal user during the design process. Personas include personal details more descriptive than age or income. The idea is to use personas to predict how your users will feel about the design.

In this role, personas have been proven to drastically improve the final user experience.

Source: Persona Tool

The key to a persona’s effectiveness is in the research.

As described in The Guide to Usability Testing, this research typically includes both qualitative and quantitative testing. Qualitative research like user interviews, field studies, or even a diary study are the best way to understand your user’s thought processes. Quantitative tests like analytics or surveys will complement the more abstract results with cold, hard facts.

Photo credit: Nicholas Wang.

Once you have your research, you’re able to construct an actual persona document. While the sections vary, we recommend each persona (as shown above from our template in UXPin) contain the following:

  1. Photo — Almost every persona includes an image, usually a stock photo. Giving your persona a face greatly helps in thinking of them as a real persona. Choose a realistic photo, so leave out any celebrities.
  2. Profile — Basically, you’ll want to put all the general demographic information here — name, age, etc.
  3. Personality — There is a lot of diversity in this category, depending on the company. It could be a detailed narrative delving into their psyche, or nothing more than a few keyword characteristics like “intelligent” and “ambitious.”
  4. Platforms — Which platforms do your personas use? How familiar are they with each? Which do they prefer and avoid? This is a great place to solidify their webographics.
  5. Goals (Motivations) — Here’s where you include the 3 goals discussed in the tips section: life goals, experience goals, and end goals. Remember that end goals are the most important.
  6. Influences — What other brands and products influence this persona? This will factor heavily into their expectations of your site, personal preferences, and decision-making/behavior.
  7. Likes & Dislikes — Another way to flesh out the persona, this section can be a practical quick-reference guide to optimizing your design for a specific user. Make a list of elements the user would appreciate, and another list of items that would frustrate or annoy them.
  8. Personal Quotes/Mottos — While completely optional, including some personal quotes and life mottos will help you get inside the

16 Places to Find the Best Free Stock Photos

Good images are a key part of putting together a great website. But finding images to use can sometimes be difficult. Your options are to take the photos yourself, buy images from a photographer or stock image site or to find images that are free and available for use. That’s what we are going to look at here today.

There are a variety of places where you can find free photos that are available for public use. Most of these images fall under a creative commons license (just make sure you attribute properly) or are old enough that the photos have returned to the public domain. (This happens once the copyright on an image expires.)

So here’s a look at 16 places where you can find great stock images at no cost. Happy hunting!

Free Images for Public and Commercial Use

Raumrot

Raumrot specializes in free, hand-selected stock photos that can be used for personal or commercial projects. Images on the site are all available in high-resolution formats. Images are available for use based on each individual photo’s creative commons license and should be displayed according to those rules.

What’s nice about the site is how it is organized. You can search for images by category and the selection of images is nice. Photos modern and vary in composition and scope.

Unsplash

“Free (do whatever you want) hi-resolution photos.” That’s the onus for Unsplash a blog-style photo site that allows you to submit your own images for public use. The site refreshes with 10 new photos every 10 days, so there’s almost always something new to choose from.

The photos on this site include a lot of landscapes to choose from, many with exceptional lighting and almost Instagram-style effects. The site is also just fun to look at. Every photo also includes a link to the photographer if you want to learn more about a certain photo.

Little Visuals

With plenty of options from high-resolution landscapes to tight, detail shots from buildings, Little Visuals has a little something for a variety of projects. Follow the site and download photos individually or register and get seven new images sent to your inbox every week.

This site is pretty new, with just a few months under its belt, but the images are sharp and crisp. Each image is free to use thanks to creative commons public domain dedication, so none of the images have applicable copyrights.

Gratisography

Ryan McGuire of Belle Design has a fun site where he upload new free-to-use photos every week. The images can be used for personal or commercial projects and every image includes a high-resolution version.

The site has a definite vibe to it, with a variety of super-fun images.

Free Refe Mobile Photos

This site has a variety of images – mostly of objects and landscapes – with a twist. Each image was taken using a mobile device. With a nice selection to choose from, these free images can work well for digital projects, but many

The Ultimate UX Design of the Perfect CTA Button

The Importance of Buttons

A button placed in the wrong area of a page, which uses the wrong color, can stop a user in their tracks. The button is meant to direct users into taking the action you want them to take.

If they don’t take it, then the button has failed for one of the following reasons:

  • The button is placed in an area that’s unfamiliar to the user;
  • The color turns the user off or doesn’t stand out enough;
  • It’s not immediately obvious that the button exists.

According to UX Movement, we can categorize all CTA buttons as:

  1. Positive – changes, sends or adds information. For example, a button accompanying a newsletter signup box would send information;
  2. Neutral – no changes are made, or the button takes the user back to a screen (e.g. cancel);
  3. Negative – deletes or resets information.

Consider Color and Contrast

UX Movement points out that you want to have clear color contrast because it helps users figure out what action to take. If your main CTA button blends in too much with the background or looks like any other button, then users will feel uncertain. At best, this will slow them down. At worse, they won’t click.

This is especially important for your users who may suffer from colorblindness. Colors can appear very similar to the colorblind user even when they appear completely contrasting to sighted users.

The red versus green button argument is a good illustration of why you should consider users with color blindness.

Image source: UX Movement

Let’s review the red/green debate briefly. Red typically implies “stop” or “delete” in most people’s minds. But there are those that hold fast that users are more inclined to click a red button over a green one. So the question becomes — which one to choose?

Take a look at the image above. On the left is how someone who can see colors would see the difference between red and green. On the right, look at how a colorblind user views the two colors — both of which appear as very similar shades.

As we described in Web UI Design for the Human Eye, the discrepancy is because red and green appear opposite each other on the color wheel (they complement rather than contrast each other). Faced with this, a colorblind user processing and interpreting the colors probably won’t take the action.

Red and green appear opposite each other on the subtractive color wheel

Image source: Wikipedia

Using red and green next to each other would certainly be a mistake. You’ll also want to consider the background color behind the button. For example, a green button on a blue background will just disappear because the colors are too similar. This effectively cancels out any action the user might take and causes analysis paralysis.

See the image below for a quick color psychology guide to inform your choices. It will depend on the type of site you’re designing  and its brand personality. You should also think about the user and who is likely to be using the site and clicking on the buttons to inform your

Material Design Lite A Giant Library of Web Components

Google Developer team recently released a library of components in their Material Design style called Material Design Lite, or MDL for short. It’s a library filled with numerous design components like buttons, forms, and everything else your heart could desire really. They are considering this library to be framework-agnostic in order to make it extremely flexible for people to use. Additionally, one of its key benefits is the fact that it is developed in ‘vanilla CSS, HTML and JS. So far so good.

“Material Design Lite lets you add a Material Design look and feel to your websites. It doesn’t rely on any JavaScript frameworks and aims to optimize for cross-device use, gracefully degrade in older browsers, and offer an experience that is immediately accessible.”

You can download the Material Design Lite library, on their website. You can also peruse their Github repo.

Simple tech behind the scenes

A key component to this library is the fact that it’s easy to install. That’s a brilliant step one because it would not make for a great free resource if it was difficult to use from the get go. However, the whole library is based on simple markup, hance they describe is as vanilla. The simple structure of the library makes it compatible with many browsers – another plus. It supports modern browsers like Chrome, Firefox and even Microsoft Edge. The library does promise smooth degradation to the more challenging browsers, like IE9.

Material Design Lite Browsers

A big principle in making this library was its flexibility and accessibility across devices and browsers; it’s impressive that they have achieved it. We all know this is important but we can’t always afford the time to make our designs this flexible ourselves; once again, it’s a huge plus for the library.

Take a look a a code snippet for the round flowing buttons. The markup for the library is easy to follow in terms of syntax as well.

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<!-- Colored FAB button -->
<button class="mdl-button mdl-js-button mdl-button--fab mdl-button--colored">
  <i class="material-icons">add</i>
</button>
<!-- Colored FAB button with ripple -->
<button class="mdl-button mdl-js-button mdl-button--fab mdl-js-ripple-effect mdl-button--colored">
  <i class="material-icons">add</i>

Top 10 Mistakes that Make your Website Look Unprofessional

Building your own website can seem like a good idea for money-strapped entrepreneurs. You can just get a designer on board later on, when your startup gains some ground, then you’ll worry about insignificant things like that.

Right?

Actually, design can prove to be much more important for your fledgling business than you may imagine. When you run an online business, visitors’ judgements of it always depend on tiny details in your design.

Customers are distracted. They trust a few major brands already. Why should they suddenly start trusting you? Unless you catch them within the first few seconds, they’re out.

Ultimately, it’s the tiniest details that make the most difference. But these details must be carefully examined and fixed, if you are to build a trustworthy brand and build revenue. In this post, I’ll talk about common web design errors that amateur designers make. Even if you have limited design abilities, you’ll be able to recognize some of the common mistakes that may have also crept into your web design.

Note: the examples used in this post are startups that specifically asked for feedback on their respective websites.

1. Improper Use of Template

I don’t condone using templates for large businesses, but I can see the need for them in small, bootstrapped startups. However if you end up using one, it’s a good idea to get a designer to properly customize it to your branding. You may even end up with a pretty good product.

A common problem on websites built with pre-designed templates is a weak visual connection between the logo and the rest of the website. There will be colours used in the logo that aren’t repeated anywhere on the website, or fonts that don’t fit well with ones used in the site.

If you’re saving on branding development package, at least make sure that the template is not obvious.

2. Using Default Bootstrap Look

A different, but equally horrifying error is using the default Bootstrap design for your company website.You’re not fooling anyone by using Open Sans. It’s hard to distinguish between all the website that are using the same design and it’s hurting your brand.

One giveaway that your site is built with Bootstrap is Font Awesome. It has (like Bootstrap) gained massive popularity due to its exhaustive library of basically all icons you could possibly want with a consistent visual language. And using it as a helpful addition to complex interfaces if perfectly fine.

Surely, your app’s benefits are more original than three generic icons? Why not try finding another, more detailed icon set to illustrate your main selling points or — wild idea — get an illustrator to do it for you?

3. Typography Contrast Issues

Fonts are a much bigger deal than most non-designers realize. They will make or break your entire design, even though they are just “letters”.

A common problem on “home-made” web designs is that there is too little contrast between headline and body fonts. Just implementing some size variation mostly doesn’t cut it. Try

How to Combine Traveling and Web Design Career

Traveling is an exciting experience, it opens your eyes, widens your mindset and certainly inspires you for more. I’ve been traveling since I left high school in 2011, I went to study Multimedia Design & Communication in Denmark, I did an internship in a design agency in London, UK and after a quick trip around the Europe, I’ve left for a journey of my life – a tour around the world as a digital nomad.

What is a digital nomad, you may ask, a digital nomad is an individual with a certain skillset like writing, programming or designing, that leverages remote work opportunities to travel the world.

In this article I’d like to share how I traveled the world and worked as a freelance web designer while building Despreneur. I want to inspire an idea that you as a web designer can easily combine these two activities and completely redesign your lifestyle. Collect moments, not things they say. As a web designer you’re able to produce your work without physically being in the place so it gives you the freedom to move anywhere in the world as long as you have an internet connection. Read also our previous article about How to Work as A Freelance Designer and Travel.

Plan Thoroughly

Not a surprise but you need to plan your itinerary, future destinations and getting paid for very simple reasons: to save time, money and stress while you’re on the road.

Some of the things you need to think of are:

  • Where will you get web design clients?
  • How are you going to get paid?
  • What happens if you’re not able to work for a month or two?
  • Where are you going to live?
  • What about health insurance and taxes?

Before leaving make a rough plan of where you want to go, let your relatives, friends and family know that you are leaving.

It’s very important to contact your bank and other institutions and inform them about your leaving. Make sure they activate online payments in your cards, enable a risk of your card being used in third world countries, also make sure to get medical check ups. Get a credit card (if you can) that covers travel insurance.

From the professional perspective, ensure that you have a fully working laptop, charger with adaptors for different countries, get a Skype or other VoIP service credit for cheaper international calls.

Ideally, have a list of clients queuing up for your work, healthy work pipeline will give you a lot of confidence and peace of mind. If you don’t have enough clients yet, hold on, save some money and work on booking some clients for the future.

How To Get Remote Jobs?

This might be a huge headache at the beginning, especially if you were getting physical jobs only. However, updating your portfolio, looking for previous clients and talking to them about a remote work possibility will put odds in your favor.

Focus on good relationships with your clients, if it’s a permanent position, look for

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